How to Live to 100 (Or at least My Plan)

How to Live to 100 (Or at least My Plan)

My husband once told me that the maximum human life expectancy is 125. He then told me I should live to 126, just to spite science. Seems like a good enough reason to me to max out all the world records.

Now, how to do it? My Science Deifying Life Span Plan consists of 7 simple steps, most of these are based off of National Geographic’s study of the Blue Zones. To be honest, I say simple steps, but in reality, I have yet to implement most of them. But with living to 126, I think I have some time.

Read More

In Your 30s or 40s? Why a Balance Test Makes Good Sense

In Your 30s or 40s? Why a Balance Test Makes Good Sense

Falls are serious business. In fact, they're the leading cause of injury for those over the age of 65. Every year, one in three adults age 65 and older sustain slips and falls, which results in injuries such as hip fractures and head trauma, thus greatly increasing the risk of death.

Read More

The New Science of Slips and Falls: What the Research Tells Us

The New Science of Slips and Falls: What the Research Tells Us

While we've all seen the old banana peel skit, slips and trips in the real world are no laughing matter. Simply falling to the floor or pavement from an upright position causes a great many serious injuries, and even deaths, each year. No one really knows for certain how many falls could actually be prevented, but the topic is of growing interest to a wide variety of people, from public health officials, designers, architects and community planners to business owners, workplace supervisors and employees. Senior citizens are perhaps the most at risk.

Read More

Fitness Standards for Adults: Here's What They're Good For

Fitness Standards for Adults: Here's What They're Good For

President John F. Kennedy once said, "Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity." Since July 16, 1955, the American government has shown at least a political interest in the health of Americans. Under President Eisenhower, the President's Council on Youth Fitness established a beachhead against the lagging health of American youth compared with citizens of other countries. Military officers in World War II complained that their recruits were out of shape. Perhaps Eisenhower's program was meant to help reverse that condition. However, it wasn't until President Kennedy that the Commander-in-Chief took an active role in promoting standards and committing resources to them.

Read More

What You Can Learn From "The Healthiest Places to Live"

What You Can Learn From "The Healthiest Places to Live"

While your own genes certainly play a role, studies have consistently found that other factors (including environmental and behavioral ones) are even more important when it comes to living a long and healthy life. These factors include keeping active, maintaining a healthy diet, keeping stress levels low, remaining socially "connected" and having a positive outlook on life. With these types of things in mind, it seems obvious that having a healthy lifestyle is easier to do when you live in a place that's supportive of your wellness goals. But what does a place like that look like? And is it possible to make your own local environment look a little bit more like that?

Read More

The Facts About Alcohol and Weight Loss

The Facts About Alcohol and Weight Loss

Drinking alcohol while trying to achieve weight loss can be a double-edged sword, and there is no real scientific consensus about this topic. The good news is that alcohol has been shown to raise the metabolism. Some studies have also shown that as alcohol consumption increases, the amount of sugar consumed decreases. Plus alcohol contains no fat, cholesterol or sodium. Now for the bad news. The downside of alcohol (at least in terms of managing your weight) is that it is essentially a sugar.

Read More

Top 5 Ways to Keep Your Knees Younger Longer

Top 5 Ways to Keep Your Knees Younger Longer

Some aches and pains are normal as we age, but there's no reason why we should not try to keep them to a minimum. Knee health is important in keeping you mobile as you get older, and experts agree that the best way to keep them in good shape is (ideally) to avoid receiving a knee injury. Even old injuries to the knee that may have happened when you were in your 20s can come back to haunt you in your retirement years. You may not be able to go back in time and avoid the injury, but there are some things you can do to help keep your knees from being prone to injury. Following are the top 5 ways experts recommend to keep your knees younger longer.

Read More

The Bright Side of Aging

The Bright Side of Aging

Our culture places a lot of value on maintaining our youth for as long as possible. But no matter how hard you try and how many products you buy that guarantee you a more youthful appearance, we all eventually grow old. But getting older does not necessarily mean that life is all downhill from the age of 30. There are considerable benefits-both mental and emotional-to be gained from growing older.

Read More

Keys to Strengthening Your Immune System

Keys to Strengthening Your Immune System

We are bombarded daily with all sorts of microbes that can cause illness. Interestingly, if we are exposed to a wide range of these microbes as children, studies have shown that we will have a lower risk of asthma and allergies as well as a stronger immune system. There are a number of factors that influence the health of our immune system, including diet, stress, exercise and aging. Following are some strategies you can use to help strengthen your immune system

Read More

Summer SAD Explained

Summer SAD Explained

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) in winter is a widely-known phenomenon. There is less sunlight during winter days, which affects the serotonin ("happy" hormones) produced in response to light striking our pineal gland, causing depression and listlessness. But not many people are aware that SAD has a summer equivalent as well.

Read More

Falls Among Seniors: What You Should Know

Falls Among Seniors: What You Should Know

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in three adults over the age of 65 has a fall in any given year. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death for adults in this age range, as well as the most common cause of trauma-related hospital admissions. More than 1.6 million older adults go to the emergency room for fall-related injuries each year in the United States. Whether you are above the age of 65, or you care for someone who is, knowing how to prevent a fall could help you save a life.

Read More