Chiropractic Does NOT Lower Blood Pressure - Here's Why

Chiropractic Does NOT Lower Blood Pressure - Here's Why

“There have been several studies over the years (two recently, including one at the University of Chicago Medical School) that talk about the chiropractic adjustment’s ability to lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. You might think that as a chiropractor these kinds of studies make me very happy. While I am happy that chiropractic is getting some positive press, I am actually quite disturbed by these kinds of studies that show chiropractic to be a treatment (alternative or otherwise) for any kind of dis-ease, including high blood pressure.

Read More

What is Normal Blood Pressure

blood-pressure-cuff-200-300

Your blood pressure can change on a regular basis, depending on what you are doing, your diet, temperature, overall health, level of stress and the medications you may be taking. Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a common problem these days, though hypotension (low blood pressure) can sometimes cause problems too. So just what is considered "normal" in terms of blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the measure of force on the body's arterial walls as the heart pushes blood through the body. The amount of blood being pumped, in addition to how large and flexible your arteries are, determines your blood pressure. Two measurements are responsible for determining your blood pressure: systolic pressure and diastolic pressure.

Systolic pressure is the measure of pressure in your arteries when your heart contracts, and diastolic pressure is the pressure measured when the heart is at rest. The accepted measurement of "normal" blood pressure is considered a systolic measurement just below 120, and a diastolic measurement just under 80 (written as 120/80). Anyone with a measurement higher than that, but below 140/90, has pre-hypertension or "high-normal," and someone whose blood pressure is higher than 140/90 has hypertension. A measurement higher than 180/110 indicates a hypertensive crisis, and emergency care should be sought.

Though a person with blood pressure lower than 90/60 is considered to have hypotension (low blood pressure), in general, the lower your blood pressure, the better. Low blood pressure is not considered a problem unless it is causing symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting, in which case a doctor should be consulted, as it may indicate dehydration or a more serious medical problem.

High blood pressure is the more common problem, as it makes the heart work harder and is damaging to the arteries, leading to a greater risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney disorders. Systolic pressure rises in many people as they age, due to the buildup of arterial plaque over time and stiffening of the arteries. About a third of American adults have high blood pressure.

One high reading in itself does not necessarily indicate that you have high blood pressure. For example, many people find that just visiting the doctor's office is stressful, which temporarily raises their blood pressure while there, and it falls back to normal levels once they leave. However, if either the systolic or diastolic reading remains high over a period of time, then treatment for high blood pressure will be necessary, which can involve changes in diet and lifestyle and/or medication.

 

 

Do Thin People Need Exercise

Do Thin People Need Exercise

Many people believe that exercise is something only fat people should do, and a lot of people exercise with the sole goal of losing weight. So why should thin people exercise if they are already at the "ideal dress size" and "optimal weight"?

Even though exercise helps a great deal with weight loss, it also improves our health in many other ways such as reducing the risk of heart disease, lowering cholesterol levels and reducing high blood pressure. Even though these conditions are associated with obesity health risks, thin and sedentary people shouldn't assume they are risk-free

Read More

The Parasympathetic Nervous System

The Parasympathetic Nervous System

The parasympathetic nervous system, the sympathetic nervous system, and the enteric nervous system comprise the autonomic nervous system in the body. The autonomic nervous system is continuously active and is responsible for unconscious regulation of our glands and organs. The parasympathetic nervous system takes care of "rest and repair" activities, such as salivation, tears, sexual arousal, urination, digestion and defecation. These activities are complementary to those of the sympathetic nervous system, which activates processes associated with the "fight or flight" response.

Read More

Why You Should Drink More Water

Why You Should Drink More Water

Water is the elixir of life, but do we get enough of it? Many people think that substituting sodas, coffee and juice for water is enough to keep us hydrated and healthy, but nothing can beat the original and the best - water.

Our bodies are made up of 43-75% water, and it's an essential component of our health. The wide range in percentages comes from measuring different populations ranging from newborns (~75%) to obese people (~45%), with normal adult hydration at about 57-60%.

We can survive a month without food, but we'll die after a week without water.

Read More