How to Choose the Best Mattress for Spinal Support

How to Choose the Best Mattress for Spinal Support

Ashely Little, our friend over at Mattress Advisor , wrote us this great article on helpful tips for choosing the best mattress for your spine. You spend a significant portion of your life in your bed. It’s important to choose a mattress that will best support you and not be a detriment to your health!

“We think about our posture during the day while we’re sitting and standing, but it’s not something we can be conscious of in our sleep. Keeping correct posture is vital to protecting our back, neck, and joints from strain. How are we supposed to take care of that while we sleep?

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How a Visit to the Chiropractor Can Help You Sleep

How a Visit to the Chiropractor Can Help You Sleep

Difficulty falling and staying asleep, restlessness, and early waking are all problematic symptoms of insomnia. If you're struggling to get the seven to nine hours of sleep you need, a chiropractor can help you identify the source along with a treatment plan. While a chiropractor takes a holistic approach to your sleep health, we’re covering just three areas – pain, sleep position, and breathing issues – where chiropractic treatments may bring relief.

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Ultimate Mattress Guide

Ultimate Mattress Guide

Are you waking up sore and feeling as tired as you did when you went to bed? Have you had your mattress for more than 7 years?

Are you sleeping as well as you did a year ago? Have you had a better night’s sleep in a bed other than yours? If you answer yes to any of these questions, it might be time to change your mattress.


Unfortunately, mattresses do not last forever, and like anything, they will have a degree of wear and need to be replaced.  There are literally thousands of mattresses to choose from and there is no such thing as a perfect mattress for a particular condition (like back pain) or situation.

The first point to consider is that Size Matters. Did you know that two people sharing a standard double size bed have only as much personal sleeping space as a baby in a cot?

What about a hard or soft mattress?

 

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What Are the Best (and Worst) Sleeping Positions?

What Are the Best (and Worst) Sleeping Positions?

Many people, regardless of age or physical stature, will wake up in the morning feeling stiff and suffering from back pain.

 

Some may even struggle to get up, but will take a few painkillers and then get on with their day the best they can.
Many back problems like this are caused by poor sleeping positions.
They can easily be improved with just a few changes to the way you lie in bed.
Some positions we find comfortable for sleeping can put extra pressure on your neck, back, shoulders and hips.
They can can all lead to stiffness and pain when we wake up.

Unfortunately, there isn't a miracle cure or a perfect position for each individual to sleep and we can't eliminate pain for everyone.
However, you can adapt your sleep position until you find the one that is right for you.

Here are two of the best and two of the worst sleep positions according to our experts.

The Best

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How to Improve Your Sleep

How to Improve Your Sleep

For more than one in three Americans, getting a good night's sleep isn't as easy you might think. According to a recent poll by the National Sleep Foundation, a combination of daily stress and lifestyle choices (including nighttime activities as well as eating and exercise habits) is causing more than a third of the U.S. population to get fewer hours of sleep than they need. Not surprisingly, the same proportion report that sleepiness has in some way affected their quality of life.

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Why Sleep Apnea is a Serious Condition

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The latest research shows that having sleep apnea significantly increases the risk of death. Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that affects at least 18 million Americans. In fact, sleep apnea is also associated with nearly double the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as early death in men, particularly middle-aged and older men. An obstructed airway causes sleep apnea, which results in cessations in breathing during sleep. This can occur hundreds of times each night. Sleep apnea often results in lowered oxygen levels in the blood, and if untreated, can lead to poor sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and increased car accidents. Mounting research reveals it may lead to far worse consequences as well.

Even those with mild to moderate sleep apnea may see an increase of up to 17% in their risk of death. A long and large study conducted at Johns Hopkins University and published this year showed results that have real meaning for the average person. Over a period of 10 years, the researchers included more than 6,400 men and women between the ages of 40 and 70. Most of the participants snored, which is the main symptom of sleep apnea. The researchers monitored their sleep patterns as well as their breathing, heart rhythms, and brain activity while sleeping. The results revealed that about half had moderate to severe sleep apnea.

Next, the researchers tracked those with sleep apnea over the next eight to ten years, monitoring and recording the incidence of sickness and death. The main illnesses they found were high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease. They made an incredible discovery: those who experienced just 11 minutes of severe sleep apnea per night, in which blood oxygen levels dropped to below 90% of normal, nearly doubled the risk of death among men. The researchers were not able to conclude the same for women, since the study included so few women with severe sleep apnea. In general, sleep apnea affects men more than women.

The researchers indicated that these results are serious and require attention by doctors as well as patients. "With such mounting evidence indicating the range of clinical effects of sleep apnea, awareness amongst health care professionals and the general community needs to increase," said study lead author Dr. Naresh Punjabi, an associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Anyone with the main symptoms of sleep apnea, including loud snoring, daytime fatigue, and difficulty concentrating should discuss their symptoms with a doctor. Lifestyle changes such as losing weight may help the problem. If you have a more serious case of sleep apnea, there is effective therapy, including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure devices that act as a sort of oxygen mask during sleep. According to accumulating evidence, not only can treating sleep apnea improve your quality of life, but it may save it as well.